Populated with quaint oceanfront towns, Maritime culture, and some of North America’s most recognisable landscapes, these destinations are the hallmark of eastern Canada.

Hopewell Cape, New Brunswick

Tidal changes have carved out these flower-pot shaped rocks

With the highest tides on earth, the shoreline of the Atlantic Ocean’s Bay of Fundy completely transforms twice a day.

The best place to see the these tidal changes is at the Hopewell Rocks Park in Hopewell Cape. Visitors can walk along the ocean floor during low tide and see the towering flower-pot rocks topped with trees which have formed over thousands of years.

Only 2 km away from Hopewell Rocks, you can walk to the park from the Artisan Suites.

St. Andrews, New Brunswick

The Algonquin has become an icon symbol of the town

The Algonquin has become an icon symbol of the town

Founded in 1783, the seaside town of St. Andrews still has many of its original buildings giving it a historic feel found few other places in the fairly new country of Canada.

An important part of the town’s rich history is The Algonquin, a hilltop resort that first opened in 1889. The original resort burned down and was rebuilt in 1915 – the same building that remains an iconic symbol of the town a century later.

Cavendish, Prince Edward Island

Visit the home of Anne of Green Gables in Cavendish

Visit the home of Anne of Green Gables in Cavendish

The town of Cavendish is home to one of Canada’s most notable literary landmarks, Green Gables. Green Gables is the farm that inspired Lucy Maud Montomery’s Anne of Green Gables series; the story of an 11-year-old orphan who is mistakenly sent to live with a family who was looking for help on their farm.

Today, visitors can step into Anne’s world with a visit to the Green Gables House as well as several museums and sites across the city. Less than 10 km from Cavendish, the rooms at Lookout In offer views of the property’s beautiful gardens and river.

Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island

Peake's Wharf Historic Waterfront is a great place for a walk

Peake’s Wharf Historic Waterfront is a great place for a walk

In 1864, Charlottetown was the meeting place of all Canadian and Maritime parties who were interested in discussing the proposed British North American Union, which would eventually become the Canadian Confederation. This is why Charlottetown is now known as the “Birthplace of Confederation”.

Take a stroll along the Peake’s Wharf Historic Waterfront to see where the country’s forefathers landed in 1864 and browse the numerous shops, café, and restaurants that line the shore.

Just a few short blocks away from confederation landing and Peake’s Wharf Historic Waterfront, the Great George makes a perfect base for immersing yourself in the city’s history.

Halifax, Nova Scotia

Grab a bite to eat at one of the restaurants along the Harbourwalk

Grab a bite to eat at one of the restaurants along the Harbourwalk

Halifax, the capital city of Nova Scotia, has a famous connection to the Titanic, as the rescue efforts came from Halifax and it was also the place where many of the victims were buried. You can see a number of artefacts from the ship at the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic in downtown Halifax.

The city is also home to a number of museums and seaside outdoor space and the downtown core is the Halifax Harbourwalk, a 3 km boardwalk lined with shops, restaurants, and small- to mid-sized ships.

At the end of the boardwalk is the museum at Pier 21, the entry point that thousands of new Canadians entered during the 1930s to 1950s. The Westin Nova Scotian is walking distance from the Maritime Museum, Pier 21, and the Harbourwalk.

Peggy’s Cove, Nova Scotia

The iconic lighthouses draws visitors from around the world

The iconic lighthouses draws visitors from around the world

Almost half a million people visit this tiny fishing village each year to catch a glimpse of the famous Peggys Point Lighthouse – a staggering number when you consider the fact that the year-round population of the village only sits around 60.

Fishing is still a big industry in the village, with an abundance of fresh fish and lobster available. The community of Peggy’s Cove maintains a rustic undeveloped appearance, which is protected from land development and has strict limits on who can purchase property.

Oceanstone Seaside Resort offers a mixture of rooms, suites, and chalets as well as a fabulous onsite restaurant called Rhubarb.

St. John’s, Newfoundland

The city's colourful houses add an inviting pop of colour

The city’s colourful houses add an inviting pop of colour

With it’s hilly streets and colourful row houses, St. John’s is often compared to San Francisco. A favourite among visitors and locals alike is “Jellybean Row”, a street where every building is painted its own bright colour.

What’s great about the city is that this colourful palette is not limited to a single spot or style of building. New and old, residential and commercial, the entire city is a kaleidoscope of colour.

The JAG Boutique Hote is no exception, with an exterior that matches the rest of the city’s colour scheme.

Twillingate, Newfoundland

Between May and July is prime iceberg season

Between May and July is prime iceberg season

Located five hours from St. John’s in northern Newfoundland, Twillingate is one of the best places in the province to spot icebergs – in fact, it’s known as the iceberg capital of the world.

If you want to see these wonders of nature firsthand, make sure to plan your trip between May and July as this is prime iceberg season. Just steps from the shore, White on Wood has free private parking available on-site.

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